Freudian Psychoanalysis | Literary Theory and Criticism

 

psychoanalytic theory in literature

Psychoanalytic Theory in Literature 's, influential predominantly in the France (Duh, because he was french) Influenced by Ferdinand Saussure The Instance of the Letter “The desired object is a substitute for the real unattainable object” Metaphor Metonymy Symbolism Example. It's also easy to write the practitioners of psychoanalytic theory off as seriously sex-obsessed weirdos. At its best, though, psychoanalytic criticism doesn't try to diagnose characters and authors, as in: that Hamlet was a total nervous wreck with a massive guilt complex, and poor Ophelia was hysterical. Examples of Psychoanalytic Theory By YourDictionary Sigmund Freud is said to be the founder of psychoanalytic theory. Psychoanalytic theory is a method of investigating and treating personality disorders and is used in psychotherapy.


What Is Psychoanalytic Literary Criticism? (with pictures)


Psychoanalytic criticism emerged in the sthe most influential interpretative theory among the series of waves in the post war period is based on the specific premises of the workings of the mind, the instincts and sexuality, developed by the 19th century intellect, Austrian Sigmund Freud who along with MarxDarwin and Nietzschesubverted the centres of Western society by boiling psychoanalytic theory in literature the human individuality into an animalistic sex drive. This stream of criticism has become one of the most exciting and challenging areas of literary and cultural studies today.

More recently, this theoretical delineation has been reworked in Poststructuralist context by Jacques Lacanwho coupled the dynamic notion of desire with Structuralist Linguistics; this has been influentially innovative as echoed in the Feminist psychoanalytic criticism. The psychoanalytic impetus psychoanalytic theory in literature is compatible with contemporary concerns of uncertainties of time, psychoanalytic theory in literature, subjectivity and meaning gained a new critical currency in Postcolonial studies, where the interest in destabilized borders and identities is very much evident.

The unconscious is the repository of traumatic experiences, emotions, unadmitted desires, fears, libidinal drives, unresolved conflicts etc. Repression is crucial to the operations of the unconscious an idea later developed by Herbert Marcuse.

There has been a consistent interest in contemporary literary studies in the unconscious eg. However, Repression does not eliminate our fears, agonies and drives, but it gives them force by making them the organizers of our current experience.

Through a similar process called Sublimation the repressed material is promoted into something more grand or is disguised as something noble. For instance, sexual urges may be given sublimated expression in the form of intense religious longings. A related neologism is defence mechanism which is a psychic procedure for avoiding painful admission or, recognition. Thus, for psychoanalysis, the unconscious is not passive reservoir of neutral data; rather it is a dynamic entity that engages us at the deepest level of our being.

Later in his career, Freud suggested a tripartite model of the psyche, dividing it into id, ego and superego. The id, being entirely in the unconscious is the most inaccessible and obscure part of our personality. It is the receptacle of our libido, the primary source of our psychic energy. Its function is to fulfil the primordial life principle, which is the pleasure principle.

It is entirely without rationality and has a tremendous amorphous kind of vitality. Ego, governed by the reality principle, is defined as the rational governing force of the psyche. It is mostly conscious and protects the individual from the id. It is the site of reason and introspection.

It is the intermediary between the world within id and the world outside superego. The superego, which is another regulatory agent, protects the society from id.

It is partly conscious and in moral parlance, can be called as the conscience of the individual. Being a repository of pride, self esteem etc. This is exemplified in his postulate of infantile sexuality. Drawing from mythology and contemporary ethnography, psychoanalytic theory in literature, Freud proposes his theory of psychosexual development critiqued for its explicit phallogocentrism in which the infant passes through a series of stages, each defined by an erogenous zone of the body, psychoanalytic theory in literature.

The stages of psychosexual development include:. A person fixated at this stage will be prone to obsession with oral activities like eating, drinking, smoking, kissing etc. Pleasure is derived from the phallic region, through behaviours such as masturbation and through fantasies. Through both fantasy and overt behaviour, he exhibits his sexual longings for the mother. Many forms of inter-generational conflict are seen by Freudians as having oedipal overtones, such as professional rivalries, often viewed in Freudian terms as reproducing the competition between siblings for parental favour.

Electra complexthe female psychoanalytic theory in literature of the phallic conflict about which Freud was less clear is more complicated. During phallic stage, the father becomes the object of her desire, as she identifies that both her mother and herself are castrated and powerless a severe critique of this Freudian concept is one of the concerns of Feminist psychoanalysts, psychoanalytic theory in literature.

Freud further states that the female psychoanalytic theory in literature relationships are tinged with a certain degree of penis-envy as she seeks a surrogate father for such bondings. Even though there are social conflicts, they are minimalised through the use of sublimation.

Freud described dreams as the royal psychoanalytic theory in literature to the unconscious, as they provide a better understanding of the repressed desires in the unconscious. They are considered as the symbolic fulfillment of the wishes of the unconscious. According to him, dreams are symbolic texts which need to be deciphered, since the watchful ego is at work, even when we are dreaming. The ego scrambles and censors the messages as the unconscious itself adds to this obscurity by its peculiar modes of functioning.

Thus the latent dream content is not vividly displayed within the manifest one, but is concealed within complex structures and codes, which is called dreamwork in Freudian neologism. The dream work includes displacement, psychoanalytic theory in literature, whereby one person or event is represented by another which is someway associated with it perhaps by a similar sounding word or by some form of symbolic substitutions and condensation whereby, a number of people, events and meanings are combined and represented by a single image in the dream.

For instance, the Roman soldier in the dream might represent the father by a process of association displacementas the father is associated with ideas of strictness, authority and power in the domestic sphere, and likewise the soldier is linked to these same ideas in the political sphere. Several meanings may also be condensed into this symbol.

If the dreamer is tempted to rebel against the father by entering into a sexual liaison of which the psychoanalytic theory in literature would certainly disapprove, then the soldier may represent the envisaged lover.

The purpose of devices like condensation and displacement are two-fold: primarily they disguise the repressed psychoanalytic theory in literature and desires psychoanalytic theory in literature in the dream, so that they can get passed the censor which normally prevents their surfacing into the conscious mind, and secondly, they fashion this material into something which can be represented in a dream, i.

Another illustration is MW. Wow interesting article. I am looking for information to write a great article about Sigmund for guest blogging at paperperhour.

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Psychoanalytic theory - Wikipedia

 

psychoanalytic theory in literature

 

It's also easy to write the practitioners of psychoanalytic theory off as seriously sex-obsessed weirdos. At its best, though, psychoanalytic criticism doesn't try to diagnose characters and authors, as in: that Hamlet was a total nervous wreck with a massive guilt complex, and poor Ophelia was hysterical. Psychoanalytic Theory in Literature 's, influential predominantly in the France (Duh, because he was french) Influenced by Ferdinand Saussure The Instance of the Letter “The desired object is a substitute for the real unattainable object” Metaphor Metonymy Symbolism Example. Psychoanalytic theory is the theory of personality organization and the dynamics of personality development that guides psychoanalysis, a clinical method for treating c-lwspreview.cf laid out by Sigmund Freud in the late 19th century, psychoanalytic theory has undergone many refinements since his work. Psychoanalytic theory came to full prominence in the last third of the twentieth.